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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 129 (some duplicates have been removed)
is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc members from virginia. >> most of these challenges were received in a timely fashion, and reviewed by the credentials committee co-chair. after reviewing each of these challenges, the co-chairs determined that neither of the challenges have merit and the members under challenge were to comment to be properly elected members of the democratic national committee. >> with that, we now recommend to this body the adoption
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
justice, distinguished justices of the court, my fellow statewide elected officials, members of armed forces and national guard, members of the consular corps, governor christine gregoire, and my fellow washingtonians. this we know,our world is changing faster and more dramatically than ever before. once in a lifetime events now seem to happen with startling regularity. we've seen the greatest financial crisis since the great depression, natural disasters fueled by climate change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the uncertainty, we see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that haswe are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things, one. with our uniquely powerfu
committee has learned its lesson. the problem isn't them, it's those americans who show up on election day. >> what is that? >> first tonight, i have a 34esage to conservatives in this country. >> mom always said. >> we have to stop being the stupid party. >> the point he made is exactly right. >> i don't see this as a rejection of our principles. >> we have to stop dumbing down everything. >> you built that business yourself. >> you did build that business. >> you built that small business. >> what is it? >> i think we need to do a better job to applying our principles. >> do you feel you have to give on something? >> we're all about trying to give and cooperate. >> this is an election that republicans are upset about because they feel like they could have won. >> it's time to get over it. stop whining. >> why do we have separate hockey leagues? you know, women should be out there playing ice hockey with the guys in the nhl. >> put your uniform back on. it's time to get back in the game. >> what is that? ♪ ♪ don't worry, be happy >> we begin this afternoon with the gop. please be
on something? >> we're all about trying to give and cooperate. >> this is an election that republicans are upset about because they feel like they could have won. >> it's time to get over it. stop whining. >> why do we have separate hockey leagues? you know, women should be out there playing ice hockey with the guys in the nhl. >> put your uniform back on. it's time to get back in the game. >> what is that? ♪ ♪ don't worry, be happy >> we begin this afternoon with the gop. please be sympathetic. they are meeting together in north carolina for the first time since their november drubbing. and it does seem as though republicans are working through some of the five stages of grief, denial, anger, karl rove bargaining for ohio, a grim winter of depression, and are now moving slowly toward acceptance that something has gone badly wrong. but that's not to say anything is wrong with their leadership. oh, no. after all, today they've re-elected as chairman the man who presided over the many conspiracies of the 2012 campaign, reince priebus. mr. priebus appears to have done a little bit of
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
east. but because of elections, elections, today governments across the middle east in egypt, tunisia, libya, pal stipe, turkey, iraq -- palestine, turkey, iraq, they are all pursuing at least, at least independent foreign policies which are by definition much less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states and much more open to the islamic republic of iran. simply put, today the united states is in a profoundly weaker position in the middle east, and the islamic republic of rapp is in a significantly -- of iran is in a significantly stronger position. that has essentially happened because there has been a dramatic shift in the middle east balance of power. in our book, "going to tehran," we describe how part of why this shift has and is occurring is because of mistakes in american policies in the middle east. but we also describe in our book that part of what is going on is something vastly upside appreciated in -- underappreciated in the west which are the successes of the islamic republic of iran which are also driving the shift in the regional balance of power
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
the about was re-elected so we don't have to worry about the supreme court being distorted. i do think that's the case. you know over the last couple of years, we've seen state after state introduce restrictions on a woman's right for access. so the law is in place but the states can deny access and then you have some states where there's only one clinic in the entire state that provides the service. >> john: exactly. so what do you say to your constituents who might be opposed to abortion rights who maintain that it's their right because of their beliefs be it religious or otherwise to do everything they can to chip away at these rights of women? >> well, you know, i really find it to be contradictory because the same people who are against choice also say that they are opposed to government interventions and they want government to be small. but yet they want to give government the authority to determine what a woman does with her body and to tell a doctor what a doctor does in an exam room. to me, if you were constent and you were against abortion, then why don't you provide ready access
rejectionists. >> we saw in pennsylvania there is so much of the willingness to rig the election. they know they're heading into trouble and it's almost like lebanon. you know? and when i see them doing it, we're never going to be popular again so, we're going to have to rig it so gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections? that is how bad nbc has gotten that. is their coverage. >> a couple points about this quote, unquote news network. on the gettysburg address, chris matthews has it exactly wrong. just the opposite. gettiesberg address was an attempt at healing the nation's wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech, yesterday, was a left wing declaration of war against conservative movement. so it was the opposite. as for the rigging charge this is classic msnbc. going back to 2004 with keith onerman refusing to concede ohio going to bush. this is how bizarre msnbcs now, they're saying this is -- a great conspiracy to rig elections. i don't know what they're talking about. >> oos s-. >> sean: listen this, is an extension of the obama white house, they'
have that very long, hard, primary campaign. in politics and in democracy, sometimes you win elections, sometimes you lose elections. and i worked very hard, but i lost. and then president obama asked me to be secretary of state. and i said yes. and why did he ask me and why did i say yes? because we both love our country. >> let me bring in political reporter for "u.s. news and world report" lauren fox and white house reporter david nakimura. david the first sit down interview the president has done with anyone other than the first lady. why do this? why do it now? >> i think t.j. the timing is secretary of state has served for four years. now she's leaving. she's had a bit of a tough run lately with her personal health and the situation in benghazi where the consulate came under attack. four diplomats were killed. she was in a hearing just last week. i think the president wanted to sit down and show a real thanks first of all and a show of support as she leaves. it will be interesting obviously as speculation comes in a couple of years whether she'll run for president against possibl
has his eye towards the general election, that he does not see his advantage in being as obstructionist as he was the last two years. he has an obvious advantage in kentucky. it is a red state. it is possible that there could be a democrat that could come up, if there is too much frustration. he is the senate, as much as harry reid is, because he is a party leader. congress's approval rating is in the single digits. that is not exactly something you want when you're going before voters. the more he can look reasonable, the better he looks. host: ryan grim, explaining some of the changes to the filibuster rule. he is the washington bureau chief for the -- for "the huffington post." back to your calls -- we're focusing on the pentagon lifting the ban on combat roles for women. on twitter -- from our facebook page -- tracey says -- sac joins us from philadelphia, good morning, on the democrats' line. -- zach joins us from philadelphia, good morning, on the democrats' line. caller: when we look at the labor market, allowing men and women to serve together, it will have hug
have real challenges. and we did get whipped in the presidential election. and that's not something that we take lightly. >> but so far, there is no consensus about how to fix them. republican national committee chairman, reince priebus, is expected to be re-elected today, after quietly making nice with ron paul supporters and heading off any challenge to his leadership. he'll call for a, quote, republican renewal, in a speech this afternoon. but the rnc committee drafting the plan for change is made up of party insiders, rather than anyone who's likely to break china. meanwhile, republican governors are griping privately and publicly that the gop in washington is doing nothing to help the republican brand, after being schooled by new jersey governor chris christie. washington republicans got a talking-to last night from louisiana governor, bobby jindal, who said the gop has to stop being a stupid party and talk like adults. >> today's conservatism is completely wrapped up in solving the hideous mess that is the federal budget. we have seemed to have an obsession with government boo
in the november election. republican members are hunkered down at the annual winter meeting in north carolina. they reelected the committee chairman. the talk is extremely harsh at times with one prominent republican leader using the word stupid to describe the way he said the party has been behaving. let's bring in the political director on the scene for us. he is joining us with the latest information. pretty harsh words over there. >> yeah, there is. look, wolf, the republicans have come to grips with the results of the election. they did not win back the white house. they lost in the house of representatives and of course democrats remained in control of the united states senate. a lot of soul searching over the past couple of days for members of the republican national committee. these are the grass roots activists who come all across the country who make up the republican party. as you said, harsh words from the louisiana governor, bobby jindal who had to say this last night. >> we have got to stop being stupid. it's time for a new republican party that talks like it does. articulate ou
's licenses and state-issued id documents. >> now, a group of journalists discuss the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. they comment on why mitt romney lost the presidential election and the strategies republicans should utilize to appeal to a wider range of voters. among the participants are weekly standard editor bill kristol and msnbc host and former congressman joe scarborough. this forum was part of a conference hosted by the national review institute that examined the future of conservativism. it runs about 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> hi, everyone. wow, wow. incredibly loud, louder than i thought. apologize. i apologize to your eardrums. i'm with national review, and this is our panel on what's wrong with the right. it's going to take the next 72 hours, so i hope you all have provisions for the next couple of days. i'm here with john pod hotter and bill kristol, founder and editor of "the weekly standard," and we're going to get right into it. john podhoretz -- >> podhoretz -- >> john podhoretz, you wrote a book a few years back called "bush co
in the book about this a little. if senator kennedy had been alive, he was so critical to the election of president obama. his endorsement in the pivotal period with the turbulence in turmoil early after south carolina, i think he would have been important inside the system as a push towards something bigger and would have pushed to have more connection to outside the beltway. obama it is now traveling on the country. he is forced to because of the election. if you sit inside the beltway too long and get in the backroom deals -- >> even movements can be cloistered. i remember a dinner during the george w. bush administration in southern california. it was norman lear and his wife, larry david, bob scheer. they were sitting around w eeping in their expensive soup about the fact that we were living in hell. rupert murdoch on the media. george bush was president. norman lear had his pulse on american culture for 30 years. why cannot figure out how to deal -- deliver a message that is important and happening? >> that is important. we can find messages that speak to people where they are. t
that we chiefs are buying this is because they were appointed by mayors who were elected who are telling them precisely what to do. urban centers -- if i may finish -- urban centers are a liberal bastion. that is not result in warm and fuzzy feelings for the second amendment. >> that is where we see the massacres occurring is in places where guns are banned. you look over the past 20 years all the shooting massacres would occur in places where guns were banned. the ultimate hypocrisy that there is 1800 cops guarding our congressmen on any given day that is why these tragedies are occurring. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] lou: i think we can agree with this. it's a lot more complicated than that. i would say to both sides, do not oversimplify and let's maintain at least some intellectual discussion. mental health in the and the treatment is a relevant issue that should be discussed. these shootings are far more the responsibility of people who are mentally ill and who have not received appropriate treatment than they are of guns. >> go down the list. [talking over eac
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
there. >> one interpretation of the election is that fracking cost mitt romney the presenthe presi. it really did make a significant difference in what turned out to be swing states. >> it did. >> and not think oklahoma was in place. -- i do not think oklahoma was in place. [laughter] >> our company has doubled the size of our employment base there. we are not huge employers yet. 750 people. that is double what we were three years ago. >> one of the environmental challenges, people worry about what you put down the wells in fracking, but it is mostly water and sand. the problem is what comes up. there is naturally occurring radioactive material down there. there is our sncc, barry m.. -- arsenic, barium. in the early days they would turn the water over to the municipal water authorities, who would water it down until they got down to the legal toxicity levels, and then dump it. the problem was, what do we do with all this waste water. they have decided, let's not a bit. they figured out ways to fill the water -- dum pit. they figured out ways to filter the water. >> that was someth
as conservatives to look at the november election and that exhult -- exultant, unabashed embrace of the left and to have a moment's despair. let me say this room is critical to preventing that to happen. "national review" has a lornings -- long, long history of standing athwart history and yelling "halt." we can stop this. we can turn it around and in fact i am right now incredibly, incredibly optimistic, as they say, it's always darkest before the dawn, that we are on the verge of a rebirth of conservativism. [applause] so what do we do? how do we make that happen? let me talk at two different levels. short-term and long term. short term let's talk about tactics on the ground. in washington, d.c. we have a president who's feeling his oats. he's reading his press releases and believes he is unstoppable. we have a democratic senate that are feeling their oats. they've read the kool-aid. let me give three bits of advice. and by the way, read the kool-aid would be just mangling, reading the press releases, drinking the kool-aid -- if they read the kool-aid it doesn't work nearly as well -- [lau
the short term. >> let's delve into more of the causes of it, the election result, and this may be a false choice, but to what extent do you think the outcome had to do with romney's weaknesses as an anecdote and how much had to do with the content he was trying to sell and perhaps the staleness of it, how much was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the inintrusiveness expansion of the government. it essentially was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and a referendum on the question of the size, the scope, the reach of government, and it was kind of a pure ideological election, because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for a president, you weren't voting up and down on a figure, you were v
allies have won election in tuesday's israeli elections. he will get a third term as president but his power is diminished after his party lost about 11 seats. >>> also overseas this morning, british prime minister david cameron made a critical speech on the uk's rocky relationship with the eu. cameron proposed a bold referendum to allow british voters to decide whether or not to exit the alliance by 2016. >> there's no doubt we're more powerful than washington, delhi because we're a powerful player inside the union that matters for british jobs, and security. it matters to our ability to get things done in the world. it matters to the united states and other friends around the world, which is why many tell us clearly they want britain to remain in the european union. if we left the european union, it would be a one-way ticket, not a return. >>> let's take an early look at the markets. we'll get all up in your business this morning. steve sedgwick is live in london, which is still at this hour firmly part of the european union. >> and set to be for a bit longer. there was a huge caveat
, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by the pentagon investigation going back to the petraeus case. thanks to all of you, david sanger and kelly o'donnell, of course, and chris cillizza, see you later. thanks very much. >>> clinton today put a lot of blame on congress for withholding aid. >> we have to get our act together between the administration and congress. if this is a priority and if we are serious about trying it help this government stand up
elections, sometimes you lose elections. i work very hard, but i lost. and then president obama asked me to be secretary of state. and i said yes. and why did he ask me and why did i say yes? because we both love our country. >> it is incredible when you think about the fierce political rivalry that once existed between these two. now two opinions from two smart reporters on whether or not she will make a bid for the presidency. but first kate bolduan takes a look back at how battles evolved into this partnership. >> reporter: barack obama and hillary clinton have faced questions together before. here in a 2008 presidential debate with cnn's wolf blitzer. >> i don't want to just end the war, but i want to end the mind-set that got us in the war in the first place. that's the kind of leadership i intend to provide as president of the united states. >> and of course -- >> senator clinton, that's a clear swipe at you. >> really? >> reporter: back then it was a very different relationship, in the midst of an already bitter rivalry. >> while i was working on those streets, you were a corporat
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 129 (some duplicates have been removed)

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